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The EcoTarium in Worcester hosts new exhibit,
Seasons of Change

The Seasons of Change exhibit opened on March 2nd at the EcoTarium in Worcester. Seasons of Change logo

Find out more about this special exhibit that explains global warming changes that can be seen in your backyard. Click the logo to the right.

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Science and Climate News for Science Educators

  • WARMING DRIVES OFF CAPE COD'S NAMESAKE ALONG WITH OTHER DINNER FISH

    codPORTLAND, Maine – Fishermen have known for years that they've had to steam farther and farther from shore to find the cod, haddock and winter flounder that typically fill dinner plates in New England.

    A new federal study documenting the warming waters of the North Atlantic confirms that they're right — and that the typical meal could eventually change to the Atlantic croaker, red hake and summer flounder normally found to the south. Read the story here.

  • ocean

    OCEANS ABSORB FEWER FOSSIL FUELS
    AS GLOBAL ECOSYSTEMS CHANGE

    The world’s largest carbon sink is become less efficient as the global climate changes, suggests a recent study led by Columbia University oceanographer Samar Khatiwala. Approximately 93 percent of carbon is stored in algae, vegetation, and coral under the sea, but oceans have absorbed nearly 10 percent fewer fossil fuels since 2000. They can no longer keep up with constantly increasing carbon dioxide levels. Read the story here.

NESCC NEWS

KEEP CONNECTICUT COOL ENTERS ITS FOURTH YEAR

The Keep Connecticut Cool Climate Change Challenge (www.keepconnecticutcool.org) is going into its 4th year. Fifth- to twelfth- grade students who participate create climate change solutions in their schools and communities. Over the last 3 years more than 600 students have participated and done extraordinary work to reduce climate change.Keep CT Cool

Two years ago we held a workshop for participants at Mystic Aquarium and invited science centers to participate. We are reviving that workshop and extending the invitation once again. The date is Saturday, February 27. We will be setting the agenda in the next 2 weeks. Participating centers will be provided a table and able to interact with both Keep Connecticut Cool students (100+) and general attendees at the Aquarium on that day.

In 2008 we had an Audubon table about bird migrations and effects on Connecticut populations, eeSmarts activities, and Eli Whitney making a cool little LED robot, and Peabody talking about animals in Connecticut. We hope that many centers will be able to join us in sharing the broad story of Connecticut Climate Change issues, and sharing resources and program opportunities with our attendees and the Aquarium visitors. There is no cost for you and lunch will be provided. If you would like to participate, please contact Laurel Kohl (KOHLL@easternct.edu or 860.465.0256) by January 8.

If you know of students who would like to participate, please share the Keep Connecticut Cool link with them. Teams must be registered to attend and can do so through the www.keepconnecticutcool.org site.

WELCOME TO OUR NEW MEMBER: THE CONNECTICUT SCIENCE CENTER JOINS THE FAMILY

logoA new and exciting addition to the Northeast Science Center Collaborative—the Connecticut Science Center—aims to be cutting edge and unique in how it helps youth discover science. Boasting 40,000 square feet of 150 hands-on exhibits, 4 educational labs, and a 3-D theatre, it is engaging and motivating while instructing visitors on a wide array of science topics.

The Connecticut Science Center has exhibits that are particularly interesting from a climate change perspective. Its “Energy City” exhibit allows for visitors to explore alternative energy through such engaging activities as "energy watt" pinball. You can also calculate your personal carbon footprint, add up the savings of select "smart energy" behaviors, and tour virtual town settings to measure the effect of energy usage and its impact on people, the planet, and profits. Its “Planet Earth” exhibit introduces changes, both big and small, that our climate has undergone. It discusses the people who try to forsee future weather pattern and allows visitors to attempt to make their own predictions.



Global Warming Links